Animal Management

Animal Management

Dogs

All animal management must comply with the stipulations of Local Law 2 Animal Management and Subordinate Local Law 2 Animal Management 2014.

Animal Registration

Dogs must be registered with Council before they are over twelve (12) weeks old or within 14 days of moving to the Cloncurry Shire. To register your dog complete the Dog Registration Form, drop it off to the Council Administration Office and pay the dog registration fee that applies. There can only be two (2) of each species registered to any one allotment in the designated town area.

Download the 2024-2025 Registration Form.

2024/25 Annual Dog Registration Fees

*Dogs - per dog/bitch desexed and microchipped only - 100% discount if paid within the advertised discount period (between 1 July & 30 September)

 


Cost per dog/bitch
 

Entire – Not microchipped or desexed

$165.00

Entire – Microchipped

$100.00

Desexed – Not microchipped

$52.00

Desexed – Microchipped

$25.00*

First dog owned by Pensioner with Concession Card (must be desexed & microchipped)

FREE

Annual Application & Permit Fee – $500.00 Permit to keep more than 2 dogs – does not include registrations.

Microchipping

All dogs and cats born after 10 April 2009 must be microchipped before they are sold or given away. All regulated dogs must be microchipped regardless of when they were born.

Microchips may be implanted only by a vet or other authorised implanter. Contact Cloncurry Vet Services for more information about the services they offer.

When the microchip is read or scanned (harmless to animals) it shows the microchip number which is linked to information about the animal, including its owner and the owner's contact details. It is your responsibility to make sure these records are kept up to date. This information is important if your animal is lost or impounded. 

For more information contact Cloncurry Shire Council or visit the Queensland Government's website.

Fact Sheet

  • Microchipping

Change of Details

It is your responsibility to keep your dog/s registration details up to date. If your details change, please contact Cloncurry Shire Council to make a change to your pet/s registration details.

Working Dogs

Information about working dogs to come. In the meantime, please contact Cloncurry Shire Council if you have any questions.

  • The owner of an animal must provide a proper enclosure to contain the animal on the owner’s premises.
  • The premises must be fully fenced and the fence must be made of a strong and firm material to prevent the animal from escaping over, under or through the fence.
  • Any gate on the premises must be kept closed at all times, with an adequate latch to prevent the animal from escaping through the gate.
  • Adequate water and shelter must be provided at all times.
  • The animals must be on a lead or harness when outside your yard and must be under the control of a competent person.
  • Consider having your pet desexed to avoid unwanted litters.
  • Meet new laws regarding standards for safeguarding the welfare of breeding dogs and their puppies

Animal Welfare

If you decide to keep a pet, you have a duty of care to provide for its needs. Before getting an animal, find out if it has any special needs.

You should always make sure you have the time, money, room and capability to care for the type of animal you want before you get it.

Please be mindful that during hot days, animals should be provided with clean drinking water daily and adequate shade.

If you believe an animal's welfare is compromised, please call the RSPCA on 1300 264 625 or the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries on 13 25 23.

Desexing

We recommend that you have cats and dogs desexed if they are not intended to be kept for breeding. This prevents an unwanted litter and helps to reduce the number of animals that have to be euthanised. Desexing also helps to prevent male pets from straying during mating seasons. Contact Cloncurry Vet Services for more information about the services they offer.

Regulated Dogs

In Queensland, regulated dogs are prescribed under the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 and include:

  • restricted dogs
  • declared dangerous dogs
  • declared menacing dogs.

An authorised local government officer can declare a dog to be dangerous or menacing if it:

  • has attacked, or acted in a way that caused fear to, a person or another animal or
  • may, in the opinion of an authorised person having regard to the way the dog has behaved towards a person or another animal, seriously attack or act in a way that causes fear to a person or animal.

Requirements for keeping regulated dogs

Once a dog has been declared dangerous or menacing or if it is a restricted dog, the owner must comply with certain requirements including:

  • microchipping the dog
  • keeping the dog in an enclosure approved by local council that complies with a strict set of requirements including that it is child-proof and the dog is not able to escape or protrude from it
  • displaying a sign/public notice at or near each entrance to the place where the dog is kept to notify the public a regulated dog is kept there
  • keeping a distinctive collar with a yellow identification tag with the words “Regulated Dog” on the dog at all times
  • keeping the dog under effective control when in a public place by someone who has the control of no more than one dog at the same time  (i.e. on a leash being held by a physically capable adult)
  • desexing the dog (dangerous and restricted dogs only)
  • muzzling the dog when it is in a public place (dangerous and restricted dogs only)
  • obtaining a permit from the relevant local council (restricted dogs only)
  • following all relevant local council laws including registering the dog.

From 1 January 2022 the distinctive collar must meet the following requirements:

  • yellow and red striped with a yellow identification tag
  • each stripe must be 25 millimetres wide and set diagonal to the rim of the collar at an angle of 45 degrees
  • at least one of the colours must be sufficiently reflective to be visible in low light
  • be made of durable materials
  • be able to be securely fastened to the dog.

For more information contact Cloncurry Shire Council.

Breeding Dogs

If your dog becomes pregnant and has a litter you must meet Queensland's animal welfare standards for breeding dogs and their progeny. Within 28 days of the litter being born you must register as a dog breeder.

Selling or Giving Away Dogs

For helpful tips on what to do when selling or giving away a dog or puppy, click the link below:

Although Council makes every attempt to identify an animal's owner and reunite them, there are situations where this is not possible or desirable, in which case the animal will be impounded. This generally arises when the animal is not wearing a Council registration tag or is not microchipped or the microchip details are not current. 

In the event that your dog becomes lost or you find a lost dog, please contact the Shire’s Ranger on 07 4742 4100.

If impounded it will appear on the below list after processing. Processing times may vary, so please check the list regularly.

FOUND

Reference Number: CP-2424-01
Type: Dog
Description: White and black
Date Found: 8 July 2024
Location Found: Meldrum Street

Dog 8 July 2024

 

 

FOUND 

Reference Number: CP-2424-03
Type: Dog
Description: White and brown
Date Found: 9 July 2024
Location Found: Short Street

Lost dog 9.07.24

 

 

FOUND

Reference Number: CP-2424-04
Type: Dog
Description: White and black
Date Found: 9 July 2024
Location Found: Short Street

Lost dog 9.07.24

 

 

 

FOUND

Reference Number: CP-2425-05
Type: Puppy
Description: Brown
Date Found: 18 July 2024
Location Found: Isley Street

Puppy 18.07.24

 

 

 

Council advertises animals available for adoption on their website and Facebook page. Adoption costs $332, which includes desexing, microchipping and registration. BIN #0000002117514.

For more information, please contact Council on 07 4742 4100 or council@cloncurry.qld.gov.au

Application for Adoption of an Animal - Form

Before purchasing a pet, there are many important decisions to make and factors to consider. Are you committed to caring for your pet?

The average lifespan of a small dog is 11 years. That's a big commitment to make and one that needs to be considered before you introduce a new pet to your home.

See Council's New Dog checklist for more information and the typical financial commitment involved with a new pet.

Animals Available for Adoption

No animals currently available for adoption.

Nuisance Dog Complaints

A dog becomes a nuisance when it is unrestrained away from the owner's premises, barks excessively, wanders at large or attacks.

Ranger Services encourage the public to try and resolve problems with their neighbours’ dogs by first approaching the dog owner when the problem arises, stating your case clearly and politely. They may not be aware of the issue.

If the problem persists, please contact Cloncurry Shire Council.

Barking Dogs

Most dogs bark, but some dogs can become a neighbourhood nuisance.  Their barking can reduce the quality of life for neighbours nearby and can lead to neighbourhood tensions.  Complaints to Council about barking dogs far outweigh any other animal management issue.

Animal noise, such as barking, is an offence under Subordinate Local Law No.2 (Animal Management) 2014.

The owner of an animal must comply with the following minimum standards:

  • take all reasonable steps to prevent the animals from making a noise or disturbance that causes a nuisance or disturbance to the occupiers of other land or premises.

If Council determines that a noise nuisance exists, compliance action can be taken which may include the issuing of fines.

Please read over this Barking Dogs Fact Sheet (LINKED PDF) for more information.

Dog attacks can occur between dogs, other animals and humans. When a dog attack occurs, it can have significant health implications resulting in physical or psychological damage for the injured person or animal.

We are all aware of the need to protect our community from the danger and fear of dog attacks. People have a right to feel safe in the community and it is the responsibility of pet owners to ensure the protection of others and to keep public areas safe for people to enjoy.

Pet owners are responsible and legally liable for the actions of their animals.

Report a dog attack

If you or your pet have been attacked by a dog, or you have witnessed an attack, contact Council immediately on 07 4742 4100. This number can be called 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; follow the prompts if it is outside normal business hours.

When reporting an attack, provide as much detail as possible, such as:

  • Date, time and location of attack
  • Description of how the attack occurred
  • Description and location of the attacking dog

Local Laws Officers will contact you to arrange a time to investigate and collect statements. Dog attacks are investigated under the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008.

Be a proactive dog owner

There are simple steps you can take to minimise the risk of your dog attacking a person or other animal.

  • Ensure you have suitable fencing so your dog cannot escape. The majority of dog attacks are committed by wandering dogs.
  • Always walk your dog on a lead when in a public place.
  • Always supervise children around dogs - particularly if a dog is sleeping, feeding or recovering from injury or illness.
  • Train and socialise your dog.
  • There are additional special responsibilities for owners of dangerous, menacing and restricted dogs.

Penalties

There are significant penalties if your dog attacks a person or another animal.

The owner can be:

  • Fined for breaches of the Local Law
  • Prosecuted in court resulting in convictions and heavy fines
  • Required to build strict fencing and containment with associated costs

Your dog can be:

  • Seized for the length of an investigation
  • Regulated as Dangerous or Menacing

Dogs that have been involved in dog attacks, or incidents that have caused fear, can be declared dangerous or menacing by Council. There are also specific breeds of dogs that the Australian Government has banned from being brought into the country. Collectively these animals are known as 'regulated' dogs.

Owning a regulated dog

You must have a permit from Council to own a regulated dog.

When a dog is classified as dangerous the owner must:

  • Ensure the dog is registered with Council as a dangerous dog (registration fees for regulated dogs are considerably higher)
  • Ensure the dog is microchipped and wears an identification tag
  • Ensure the dog is always muzzled and on a leash in a public place
  • Ensure the dog does not attack or worry another person or animal
  • Display a sign advising of a dangerous dog on the premises
  • Provide and maintain a proper and effective enclosure to prevent the dog from escaping

Declared menacing dogs

Dogs that display menacing or aggressive behaviour may progress to harmful behaviour. The menacing dog classification was introduced to address this risk.

An authorised Council officer can declare a dog to be menacing if the dog:

  • Has attacked or caused fear to a person or another animal, or
  • May, in the opinion of that officer, attack or cause fear to a person or another animal.

Declared dangerous dogs

An authorised Council officer can declare a dog to be dangerous if the dog:

  • Has seriously attacked or caused fear to a person or another animal, or
  • May, in the opinion of that officer, seriously attack or cause fear to a person or another animal.

A declared dangerous dog must be desexed.

Restricted dogs

A restricted dog is a breed of dog that is prohibited from being imported into Australia under the Customs Act 1901.

Currently these breeds include:

  • dogo Argentino,
  • Japanese tosa,
  • fila Brasileira,
  • Perro de Presa Canario (or Presa Canario) and
  • American pit bull terrier (or pit bull terrier).

You are required to have a permit to keep a restricted dog and all restricted dogs must be desexed.

Current permit holders must ensure they comply with the conditions for keeping such a dog as any breaches of those conditions may result in the issuing of fines and the permit being cancelled.

Other Animals

 

As per Schedule 1 Prohibition on keeping animals, Section 5:

  • There can only be two (2) of each species registered to anyone allotment in the designated town area.
  • There can only be one (1) livestock animal, including but not limited to horses, cattle, camels, donkeys, per one (1) acre as well as a three (3) metre buffer from other allotment boundaries in the designated town area.
  • There can only be ten (10) hens per 500 square metres in the designated town area and must be located at the rear of the allotment. No roosters allowed in the designated town area.
  • All pigs are prohibited in the designated town area.

As per Schedule 8 Requirements for proper enclosure for animals, Section 13 for all animals:

  • The owner of an animal must provide a proper enclosure to contain the animal on the owner’s premises.
  • The premises must be fully fenced and the fence must be made of a strong and firm material to prevent the animal from escaping over, under or through the fence.
  • Any gate on the premises must be kept closed at all times, with an adequate latch to prevent the animal from escaping through the gate. Adequate water and shelter must be provided at all times.
  • Must be on a lead or harness when off premises and must be under the control of a competent person.

Queensland Government website has lots of interesting and helpful information about native animals.

Living with Wildlife

It is important to be mindful that the outback is home to lots of native wildlife and the part we play in looking after them and looking out for them.

The environment is home to all sorts of wildlife. When out in the bush, make sure you take all of your rubbish with you or dispose of in rubbish bins provided. Likewise, keep your yard tidy to minimise the risk of rubbish being spread outside your yard during a storm or windstorm. 

Snakes

Snakes usually prefer to retreat when disturbed but if they feel threatened, they can become defensive. Most snake bites occur when people try to capture or kill the animals.

If you see a snake, don't panic. Back away to a safe distance and allow the snake to move away. Snakes often want to escape when disturbed.

When left alone, snakes pose little or no danger to people.

Make your backyard unsuitable for snakes.

  • Place your garden beds away from your home.
  • Keep your lawn short.
  • Stack timber piles neatly so that rodents and snakes can’t hide there.
  • Tidy up your yard during the colder months when snakes are less active
  • Place food scraps in closed compost bins to keep rodents away from your home.
  • Wear gloves, long pants and covered shoes when gardening.
  • Lift objects so that they face away from you. This will help protect you if a snake is sheltering underneath.

When walking in bushland:

  • stay on formed paths or tracks so that you can see and avoid snakes
  • carry a first aid-kit that contains pressure bandages
  • wear protective clothing such as covered shoes and trousers
  • carry a torch at night so that you can see where you are going.

Crocodiles

Crocodiles are a common occurrence in northern Queensland waterways. No waterway in northern Queensland can ever be considered crocodile-free. 

The Queensland Government website has lots of information about crocodiles and tips to being Crocwise.